Buckeyenest LLC

The Buckeyenest, your home away from home

Contact the Buckeyenest at

Phone: 937-926-4914

Email: webmaster@buckeyenest.com

Buckeyenest North EastBuckeyenest North East Ohio

To contact us:

buckeyenest SouthwestBuckeyenest South West Ohio

HELP OUR VETS IN NEED WITH YOUR CELL PHONE NOW!

There are many veterans that are in need of a hand up, not just a hand out. We, at Veterans' Outreach, stand ready to answer the call to help those vets in need. You can show your support by making a donation on your cell phone! Make a tax deductible $10 donation by texting VET to the number 52000. Remember, text VET to 52000 and $10 will be applied to your next cell phone bill. Donít forget to please select the prompt YESĒ to approve your donation. Show our honorable veterans that you care!

Assistant Care Services offers a program for veterans.† When you call tell Alfred you have a Buckeyenest fun club card to get the promotion offered with it when you show him your card.† If you donít have a card, call me at† the above† number to find out how to get one.

The Pledge of Allegiance

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible with liberty and justice for all.† Amen.

 

I enlisted in the armed forces in 1972, I recited this pledge when I was going to school in this great country in elementary school, Jr. High School and High School.† We sang the National Anthem at all school functions.† We† were taught to say, yes sir, no sir.† Yes Maím no Maím.† We opened doors for everyone when approaching them.† We wore our pants up around our waist.† We treated our women with respect, we pulled out the chair for them to sit on when it was dinner time, we walked down the street with them on our right arm.† I believe in the right to bear arms, I am an advocate of open carry.† I believe a manís word is his bond, Iím old school and since Iím a one man company, this is what the Buckeyenest is all about.† Iím tired of watching an hearing people speak out negative all the time about the land and country and the people I enlisted in the U.S. Army to protect.† Iím tired of watching this country fall apart because it is ďPolitically incorrectĒ to say something.† Iím tired of worrying about whether or not Iím going to offend someone if I say something they donít like.† Iím tired of hearing about atheists saying take the word ďGodĒ out of the pledge of allegiance, off our government buildings, out of the public eye it offends me.† Iím tired of our government spending money and sending money to other countries when our own is falling apart and we have people right here that needs it.† Iím tired of our jobs going to overseas to cheaper labor.† Are you tired? From this day forward (June 19th, 2014) let it be known that the Buckeyenest is not going to be politically correct anymore we are going to take a stand and be proud of it.

 

Have a great day

Dewey Maynard CEO/Webmaster

The wordings of the current oath of enlistment and oath for commissioned officers are as follows:

"I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God." (Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective 5 October 1962).

(the oath above is the one I swore too)

Buckeyenest Webmaster.

 

 

"I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the Army of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God." (DA Form 71, 1 August 1959, for officers.)

During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress established different oaths for the enlisted men and officers of the Continental Army:

Enlisted: The first oath, voted on 14 June 1775 as part of the act creating the Continental Army, read: "I _____ have, this day, voluntarily enlisted myself, as a soldier, in the American continental army, for one year, unless sooner discharged: And I do bind myself to conform, in all instances, to such rules and regulations, as are, or shall be, established for the government of the said Army." The original wording was effectively replaced by Section 3, Article 1, of the Articles of War approved by Congress on 20 September 1776, which specified that the oath of enlistment read: "I _____ swear (or affirm as the case may be) to be trued to the United States of America, and to serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies opposers whatsoever; and to observe and obey the orders of the Continental Congress, and the orders of the Generals and officers set over me by them."

Officers: Continental Congress passed two versions of this oath of office, applied to military and civilian national officers. The first, on 21 October 1776, read: "I _____, do acknowledge the Thirteen United States of America, namely, New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, to be free, independent, and sovereign states, and declare, that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience to George the third, king of Great Britain; and I renounce, refuse and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him; and I do swear that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain, and defend the said United States against the said king, George the third, and his heirs and successors, and his and their abettors, assistants and adherents; and will serve the said United States in the office of _____, which I now hold, and in any other office which I may hereafter hold by their appointment, or under their authority, with fidelity and honour, and according to the best of my skill and understanding. So help me God." The revised version, voted 3 February 1778, read "I, _____ do acknowledge the United States of America to be free, independent and sovereign states, and declare that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience, to George the third, king of Great Britain; and I renounce, refuse and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him: and I do swear (or affirm) that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain and defend the said United States, against the said king George the third and his heirs and successors, and his and their abettors, assistants and adherents, and will serve the said United States in the office of _____ which I now hold, with fidelity, according to the best of my skill and understanding. So help me God."

The first oath under the Constitution was approved by Act of Congress 29 September 1789 (Sec. 3, Ch. 25, 1st Congress). It applied to all commissioned officers, noncommissioned officers and privates in the service of the United States. It came in two parts, the first of which read: "I, A.B., do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) that I will support the constitution of the United States." The second part read: "I, A.B., do solemnly swear or affirm (as the case may be) to bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and to serve them honestly and faithfully, against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever, and to observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States of America, and the orders of the officers appointed over me." The next section of that chapter specified that "the said troops shall be governed by the rules and articles of war, which have been established by the United States in Congress assembled, or by such rules and articles of war as may hereafter by law be established."

Although the enlisted oath remained unchanged until 1950, the officer oath has undergone substantial minor modification since 1789. A change in about 1830 read: "I, _____, appointed a _____ in the Army of the United States, do solemnly swear, or affirm, that I will bear true allegiance to the United States of America, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers whatsoever, and observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States, and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the rules and articles for the government of the Armies of the United States." Under an act of 2 July 1862 the oath became: "I, A.B., do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I have never borne arms against the United States since I have been a citizen thereof; that I have voluntarily given no aid, countenance, counsel, or encouragement to persons engaged in armed hostility thereto; that I have neither sought nor accepted nor attempted to exercise the functions of any office whatsoever under any authority or pretended authority in hostility to the United States; that I have not yielded voluntary support to any pretended government, authority, power, or constitution within the United States, hostile or inimical thereto. And I do further swear (or affirm) that, to the best of my knowledge and ability, I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter, so help me God." An act of 13 May 1884 reverted to a simpler formulation: "I, A.B., do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God." This version remained in effect until the 1959 adoption of the present wording.

Please note, the following statement is not the opinion of the clients, vendors or anyone else associated with the Buckeyenest.† It is my own opinion and my own right to say what I feel.

 

Have a good day.

Dewey Maynard, Webmaster/CEO Buckeyenest LLC

When you place your order with Archery World† USA, Tell Billy you have a fun club card and get an additional 10% off your purchase price.† But remember you have to tell him you have the fun club card

ACN† Cleveland Training Event Sept 12-14, 2014.† Click on the registration form on the left to print it out, fill it in, add your payment plan and mail it in.

Make a donation to the 4 Freedom Team.† Click on the donate button on the left.